Thursday, May 14, 2015

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson: May 14, 2015 Legislative Updates



Senator Nelson Calls for Bob Levinson’s Release, Sponsors Resolution on Americans Detained in Iran
On Monday, May 11, the Senate voted 90-0 in favor of S. Con. Res. 16, a bill sponsored by Senator Nelson which states that the Government of Iran should immediately release Saeed Abedini of Idaho, Amir Hekmati of Michigan, Jason Rezaian of California, and cooperate in locating and returning Bob Levinson of Florida. Senator Nelson—a long-time advocate for Bob—reiterated the call again on the Senate floor for Iran to cooperate in Bob’s case.

Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act Passes Senate
Senator Nelson was an original co-sponsor and early advocate for the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015, which the Senate approved by a vote of 98-1 on May 7. This bipartisan bill ensures that Congress will weigh in on a potential nuclear agreement with Iran, and if Iran violates that agreement, allows Congress to act quickly to re-impose sanctions. The House will consider the bill (S. 615/H.R. 1191) before being sent to the President for his signature.

Identifying Sponsors of Political Advertisements
On May 7, Senator Nelson introduced S. 1260, the Sunshine in Sponsorship Identification Act, which requires the Federal Communications Commission to update its rules to ensure that political ads include disclosures containing more detailed information about the true sponsors of those ads. Senators Blumenthal, Markey, McCaskill, Peters, Warren, and Wyden joined Senator Nelson as cosponsors of the bill.

Supporting Safe Highways for Pedestrians and Bicyclists
On May 7, Senator Nelson joined eleven of his colleagues in sending a letter to the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works requesting support for provisions in the next Highway Bill that would promote the design of safer streets for pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and other users of our roads. This is a critical concern in Florida, which has some of the most dangerous metro areas in the country for pedestrians – resulting in high rates of pedestrian fatalities.